I is for Image

 

 

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Catching up on the A-Z Blogger Challenge!

 

I is for Image

Why is it I can look at myself in the mirror and easily find all my flaws?  Things I don’t notice or think are unattractive in other people, will become intolerable when it’s me I’m judging.  Even when I weighed 15 pounds less than I do now and when my body was very toned, I would look in the mirror and see only that my legs were too skinny, my hips were too big, my butt was too squishy, and so on. I didn’t see the toned muscles, the flat stomach, and healthy complexion.

I don’t consider myself someone with low self-esteem– I’m confident and like who I am. It just bothers me that I’m not perfect. Some people might say it’s the media’s fault, that there are unrealistic expectations placed on women and their appearance. That may be true… I don’t know if it’s true for me, though. I’ve been this way since as far back as I can remember.

I’m sure I’m not the only one who is this way.  What are your thoughts?

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2 thoughts on “I is for Image

  1. Great post! I reflected on Beauty for “B” and thought about how my views of beauty have evolved over time. I am right there with you with regards to being critical of my un-perfectness. I catch the flaws that no one else sees and it can certainly get depressing!!

    Knowing that much of that are things that I can’t change (like my squatty nose lol) I try to focus on the things I DO have the power to control. Inner beauty. Kindness. Compassion. Being smart. Having a voice. This is a slight silver lining during periods of the horrid cycle of criticism and self-loathing. 🙂

  2. I don’t even know where to begin with this. I could write a billion posts on it so I’ll try to keep my comment from being that long haha.

    It has to do with the media, yes, all the way back when people were writing books and only showing good looking people in the very first black and white movies. It’s only gotten worse sense then. Then, society. All the way back to when I was two, when I got my first freckle, I cried. Why? It was an imperfection in my skin that I didn’t like. My mom had to show me her freckles to make me calm down. People, especially but certainly not limited to girls, are subconsciously tought and raised to believe they must be Barbie dolls who can clean, cook, work full time, be fantastic in bed, and never mess up their mascara or have a hair out of place. I think you might want to look up Laci Green’s videos on YouTube. She has some about body image that basically says what I think also.

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